RED

RED YELLOW AND BLUE


Studio Manager, Artist Assistant, Painter, Installation/Crew Manager

 

BACK TO ART INSTALL SERVICES        VISUAL ART        CONTACT

YELLOW

BLUE

Orly Genger

RED YELLOW AND BLUE



Press Release


New York—Madison Square Park Conservancy’s Mad. Sq. Art presents a new installation for Spring and Summer 2013 by New York-based artist Orly Genger. The monumental commission, entitled Red, Yellow and Blue, features the artist’s renowned usage of intricately hand-knotted nautical rope covered in paint, creating a work that transforms the park’s lush lawns into colorfully-lined chambers. The work debuted at an inauguration ceremony led by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg on May 1, and will remain on view daily from May 2 through September 8, 2013 in Madison Square Park. Following its New York run, the installation will travel to the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum outside of Boston in October 2013, marking the first Mad. Sq. Art commission to tour.

Genger’s work artfully transcends the perceived limits of the materials she employs. This Mad. Sq. Art commission consists of 1.4 million feet of rope—the total length equating to nearly 20 times the length of Manhattan—covered in over 3,500 gallons of paint, and weighing over an astounding 100,000 pounds. Red, Yellow and Blue employs repurposed rope collected from hundreds of miles up and down the Eastern seaboard, bringing elements of the coastline to the urban setting of Madison Square Park. Together, three separate undulating structures of layered rope shaped on-site by the artist will redefine the landscape of the park, creating interactive environments that will invite visitors to explore both exposed and hidden spaces, encouraging them to navigate and experience Madison Square Park anew.

- See more at: http://www.madisonsquarepark.org/things-to-do/calendar/mad-sq-art-orly-genger#sthash.4WliPxV2.dpuf




“I really see her as one of the most important sculptors working today,” she said. From the start, she noted, Ms. Genger has been “taking on classic Minimalist and Postminimalist and feminist art at the same time, and doing it in a completely original way.”

Building each piece is something of “an endurance performance,” said Ms. Freiman, who describes the artist as “one of the toughest makers I know.”


Lisa Freiman, Indianapolis Museum of Art. New York Times Art & Design May 1, 2013

Nicholas S. Shifrin 2015

Nick Shifrin